Patrick Ness’ New Release

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First off can I just say that the UK(right) edition is much nicer than the US(left) edition. It is more aesthetically pleasing and looks way cooler than the US edition. The whole colour scheme works much better and I like how it’s all centered in the middle of the page. With the US cover there’s so much going on, it makes it difficult to look at. I think it looks more juvenile as well with the drawings on it.

Anyway this was published on August 27th by Walker Books. It is a new release as you can tell and is about the people who aren’t the heroes of the story. As in the ones who don’t kick zombie ass or fight Immortals, the people who are going about a normal life in the midst of a totally not normal world. A world filled with supernatural creatures and the fear of not being able to ask out the girl you like before the school might get blown up again. The not Chosen One’s.

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Weekly Recommendations #8

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Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly

Published October 12th 2010 by Random House Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Genres: Young Adult, Historical

Pages: 472

Rating:5/5 stars

Buy it here

This book isn’t just a YA Historical, it’s much more than that. It’s half set in modern time and half set in the french revolution. A fantastic mash up of coming of age, romance and how life was if you were a member of the royal family in france at the time. It’s a truly captivating story and I couldn’t put it down. I would recommend this to anyone who likes a bit of history thrown in there with a mystery to solve. This book is suitable for teens of any age.

Synopses:

Readers of If I Stay and Elizabeth George will love Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly, author of the award-winning novel A Northern Light. Revolution artfully weaves two girls’ stories into one unforgettable account of life, loss, and enduring love; it spans centuries and vividly depicts the eternal struggles of the human heart.

BROOKLYN: Andi Alpers is on the edge. She’s angry at her father for leaving, angry at her mother for not being able to cope, and heartbroken by the loss of her younger brother, Truman. Rage and grief are destroying her. And she’s about to be expelled from Brooklyn Heights’ most prestigious private school when her father intervenes. Now Andi must accompany him to Paris for winter break.

PARIS: Alexandrine Paradis lived over two centuries ago. She dreamed of making her mark on the Paris stage, but a fateful encounter with a doomed prince of France cast her in a tragic role she didn’t want—and couldn’t escape.

Two girls, two centuries apart. One never knowing the other. But when Andi finds Alexandrine’s diary, she recognizes something in her words and is moved to the point of obsession. There’s comfort and distraction for Andi in the journal’s antique pages—until, on a midnight journey through the catacombs of Paris, Alexandrine’s words transcend paper and time, and the past becomes suddenly, terrifyingly present.“

Happy Reading 🙂

Weekly Recommendations #6

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Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover

Published March 18th 2014 by Atria Books

Genres: New Adult, Romance

Pages: 385

Rating:4/5 stars

Buy it here

I only recently read this book, but I absolutely loved it. It was just a perfect mix of romance, music and what it’s like to be young and in love. Colleen Hoover is like the new adult version of Sarah Dessen, and my next favorite author I’m pretty sure. I would recommend this to lovers of contemporary romance with swoon worthy musicians. This book is suitable for readers 15+.

Synopses:

At twenty-two years old, Sydney is enjoying a great life: She’s in college, working a steady job, in love with her wonderful boyfriend, Hunter, and rooming with her best friend, Tori. But everything changes when she discovers that Hunter is cheating on her—and she’s forced to decide what her next move should be.

Soon, Sydney finds herself captivated by her mysterious and attractive neighbor, Ridge. She can’t take her eyes off him or stop listening to the passionate way he plays his guitar every evening out on his balcony. And there’s something about Sydney that Ridge can’t ignore, either. They soon find themselves needing each other in more ways than one.

A passionate tale of friendship, betrayal, and romance, Maybe Someday will immerse readers in Sydney’s tumultuous world from the very first page.”

Mr Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

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Mr Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

Published October 2nd 2012 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Genres: Adult, Mystery

Pages: 288

Format: Ebook

Rating: 4/5 stars

Buy it here

The Great Recession has shuffled Clay Jannon away from life as a San Francisco web-design drone and into the aisles of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. But after a few days on the job, Clay discovers that the store is more curious than either its name or its gnomic owner might suggest. The customers are few, and they never seem to buy anything—instead, they “check out” large, obscure volumes from strange corners of the store. Suspicious, Clay engineers an analysis of the clientele’s behavior, seeking help from his variously talented friends. But when they bring their findings to Mr. Penumbra, they discover the bookstore’s secrets extend far beyond its walls. Rendered with irresistible brio and dazzling intelligence, Robin Sloan’s Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore is exactly what it sounds like: an establishment you have to enter and will never want to leave.

I can’t remember exactly how I first found out about this book, but all I can say is I’m glad that I did. The whole concept intrigued me when I first heard about it. This book wouldn’t have been the usual type I would generally pick up, but lets say I’ve been branching out lately. However this book was on my TBR for quite a few months before I finally picked it up. And that was only because it fit the category for the read-a-thon I was doing. Otherwise I’m pretty sure it wouldn’t have been read any time soon. But in saying all that, I have read it and all I can say is that it was great.

The characters were created so well, I got a very clear sense of who they were. I really enjoyed reading about the customers that came into the bookstore and how Clay got to know them with each passing night. Each character had such distinct quirks about them, which made for an interesting and entertaining read. Reading from Clay’s perspective allowed me to experience the story and the events that unfolded through his eyes. I was just as much in the dark about the mystery of the bookstore as he was. It had me wondering, was this going to turn out to be a book about magic? A book about cults? I really had no idea at some points where it was going. This was a good thing though, because it kept me on my toes, interested to see what happened.

The whole mystery that shrouded the bookstore wasn’t what I was expecting. It was an interesting twist to the story, and wasn’t really something I had ever read about before. I think my favorite part was at the end was when Clay figured everything out. I just loved that scene where he gathered everyone together and revealed the secret that they had been trying to solve for centuries.

The overall world building within the story was done quite well I thought. The setting of the bookstore was interesting. It was written in such a way that I felt as if I were there. I got a clear sense of what it was like. The severe height of the shelves, towering over you. The film of dust coating every surface. How the night crept in and shrouded everything in shadows. The descriptions were so clear I felt like I was Clay, sitting behind that desk at night. It was really fun to read about Clay’s adventures, all the different places he went. New York, Google HQ, just him living in San Francisco was really intriguing to read about, since I’ve never been to any of these places myself.

I must say that I enjoyed this book and was often surprised at the events that unfolded. There were so many elements to this book. Mystery, comedy, romance, it was fantastic. And it’s always fun to read books that are set in bookstores.

I would recommend this to people who like nerdy narrators and books that are just a little out of the norm topic wise. This book is suitable for readers of all ages.

Weekly Recommendations #5

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Numbers by Rachel Ward

Published November 8th 2008 by The Chicken House

Genres:Young Adult, Sci-Fi

Pages: 285

Rating:5/5 stars

Buy it here

This is literally the most unique amazing book I have ever read. I loved this story so much. The characters were very well developed, the whole concept was so interesting. This is one of my favorite books and I highly recommend it. This book is suitable for 15+.

Synopses:

Ever since she was child, Jem has kept a secret: Whenever she meets someone new, no matter who, as soon as she looks into their eyes, a number pops into her head. That number is a date: the date they will die. Burdened with such awful awareness, Jem avoids relationships. Until she meets Spider, another outsider, and takes a chance. The two plan a trip to the city. But while waiting to ride the Eye ferris wheel, Jem is terrified to see that all the other tourists in line flash the same number. Today’s number. Today’s date. Terrorists are going to attack London. Jem’s world is about to explode!”

A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby

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A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby

Published May 2nd 2006 by Riverhead Books

Genres: Adult, Contemporary

Pages: 257

Format: Paperback

Rating: 4/5 stars

Buy it here

Meet Martin, JJ, Jess, and Maureen. Four people who come together on New Year’s Eve: a former TV talk show host, a musician, a teenage girl, and a mother. Three are British, one is American. They encounter one another on the roof of Topper’s House, a London destination famous as the last stop for those ready to end their lives.

In four distinct and riveting first-person voices, Nick Hornby tells a story of four individuals confronting the limits of choice, circumstance, and their own mortality. This is a tale of connections made and missed, punishing regrets, and the grace of second chances.

Intense, hilarious, provocative, and moving, A Long Way Down is a novel about suicide that is, surprisingly, full of life.”

I really enjoyed reading this book. The idea that four people can be so sure that they want to end their life, then in each other find the will to live, was a truly heartwarming concept. I found that I could understand them even though I myself have never been in that situation. Hornby’s writing captured the mindset of this group of people so well I felt as though I was experiencing everything with them. I loved all of the characters, they were each funny, crazy and completely normal all at the same time and I couldn’t get enough of them.

Soon after reading this book I saw the movie adaption for it. I would like to say that it was almost better than the book. The movie captured the characters very well and I thought the story was portrayed in a happier way than it was in the book. Because after all who wants to read a sad book, maybe that’s why I liked the movie better. However there were a few things that I didn’t think were great in the film. For example, Jess is meant to be a strong, independent character, but she was portrayed otherwise in the movie. They made her look fragile and crazy, I mean she is most certainly crazy but a good crazy. Fragile would not have been a word I would have thought of in relation to Jess. And they changed the ending as well, which made for a more cinematic effect but non the less didn’t stick to the original story and the impact that the true ending gave.

I have to say that Jess was my favorite character. She was so full of energy and really cared for the others although it may not have seemed like it. Jess wasn’t perfect, and knew that she often got on people’s nerves, but tried to be kind anyway. She said things that came across quite crass, but were never intended to be that way. She was actually a very intelligent character it seemed. Reading from her POV was so interesting and hilarious at times, without Jess the story wouldn’t have been the same.

I found the plot for this book to be intriguing, but at times it went a tad slowly and I got a bit bored. The whole concept of four people banding together agreeing to live and seeing where that takes them was really fascinating. This is an emotional subject and reading about these kinds of things always pulls at my heart strings. But at some points I found myself getting bored. I can’t really say why. Maybe it was because the characters were older than me, or there wasn’t anything happening at that point in the story. I don’t know. There were just some points where the story lulled, but there are moments like that in every book. Overall I found it a compelling read and the story was choc-a-block with humor, which helped to balance out the fact that they were going to commit suicide. The characters all seemed like normal people, but as you got to know them that seemed to change.

Nick Hornby is a truly captivating writer and I found my self enthralled with this book. In the future I will most definitely be reading more of his books. Probably About a Boy, since I saw the movie and liked it, which will give me more motivation to read it. He seems to write about touchy subjects or things that aren’t the norm, which always guarantees a unique read for me. Those types of books are the kind of thing I pick up when I’m feeling like I want to read about something real and not the silly contemporary crap I read most often(even though I still love that stuff). The individuality that springs forth from Hornby’s work is something I strive to read, and hope to learn from.

This was genuinely a great book and I would recommend that people read it. It’s won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but if you like eccentric characters and lots of humor alongside a serious topic, then this book is for you. This book is suitable for readers 15+ due to a mature story line. (Oh and if this doesn’t sound like your kind of thing, I would still suggest to watch the movie, it was really good).

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

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Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Published September 10th 2013 by St. Martin’s Press

Genres: New Adult, Contemporary, Romance

Pages: 459

Format: Paperback

Rating: 4/5 stars

Buy it here

From the author of the New York Times bestseller Eleanor & Park.

A coming-of-age tale of fan fiction, family and first love.

Cath is a Simon Snow fan. Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan… But for Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving. Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere.

Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to. Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words… And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

For Cath, the question is: Can she do this? Can she make it without Wren holding her hand? Is she ready to start living her own life? Writing her own stories? And does she even want to move on if it means leaving Simon Snow behind”

This book was really good, when you look at it by itself. But compared to Rowell’s other books, it wouldn’t be her best. I think I prefer when she writes adult fiction, from my reading of Attachments, which I thought was really cute. However, that’s not to say that this wasn’t a good book, because I really enjoyed it and thought it was a great story. I absolutely loved seeing all the different aspects of Cath’s life and how she was not your normal girl you would come across in books nowadays. The copy that I had had some really cool illustrations of the characters, comic book style. I thought that was a fun little thing to add to it. It was nice that at the end of each chapter there was a little extract from a Simon Snow story, being from the actual book or a fanfic, so it felt like I was reading two story’s sometimes.

Looking at Cath as a character, I think she was formed really well. It felt like she was a real person who you could meet in the street, knowing that there was more to her than meets the eye allowed for a better understanding of the story. When she finds out that her twin Wren doesn’t want to be her roommate, the emotion was so real it just made me feel sorry for her. I was able to relate to her in some aspects, like with her anxiety. I can see where she’s coming from with her feelings about meeting new people and how college life was going to work for her without her sister to help her. As Cath starts to discover who she is without her sister, she begins to experience things for herself rather than in Wren’s shadow. The writing was phenomenal in this book and the characters were all really interesting. Regan, Cath’s roommate, was so much fun to read about, with her “I don’t care” attitude and curvy figure, she felt like a real woman. When she takes Cath under her wing and try’s to show her new things, how to live and what she should be doing with her life, I just started to love her even more. As you can tell I just love all of these characters, they were all written to so well and in such a way that you can’t help but be entranced. Now on to our lovely Levi, I wish I could talk more about him, but I feel like if I do then I will be giving the story away, which wouldn’t be good. So, all I’m going to say is that he is my new Book Boyfriend. He’s so cute and you just want to hug him anytime he’s in the story. He’s always so happy and nice to Cath, trying to get her to come out of her shell and try new things, I think we all need a Levi in our lives.

If you’ve read the book you’ll probably already know this, but the Simon Snow story’s are like a remake of Harry Potter. They are set in a wizarding school and there is a really smart female character that’s way ahead of her class, just like Hermione. The main kid Simon is like the chosen one and is meant to save the world or something. So yeah it was sort of funny that it was liked Harry Potter. It’s like in books or movies where there is something that is close to the real thing in reality but isn’t it and they talk about it as though it is the real thing, because it’s essentially replacing that thing. Simon Snow was like that, except for the part where Harry Potter is mentioned in the book. That sort of ruined it because it just didn’t make sense any more. Why make up a book series exactly like HP and then keep HP in that fictional world, it just doesn’t make any logical sense. But besides that there wasn’t anything wrong with this book. It was actually pretty great and I really enjoyed reading it.

I would recommend this book to people who like story’s with real life problems and cute romances. This book is suitable for readers 15+.